Pequod

Moby-Dick: Brig

Brig

www.flickr.com
  1. a two-masted, square-rigged vessels
  2. Fleece's dialect makes the work 'big' sound like 'brig' in his sermon to the sharks in Chapter 34

The word brig appears in the following sentences from Moby-Dick:

Chapter 1 > Paragraph 7 > Sentence 6:

It is quite as much as I can do to take care of myself, without taking care of ships, barques, brigs, schooners, and what not.

Chapter 17 > Paragraph 21 > Sentence 2:

After sitting a long time listening to the long stories of some sailors who had just come from a plum-pudding voyage, as they called it (that is, a short whaling-voyage in a schooner or brig, confined to the north of the line, in the Atlantic Ocean only); after listening to these plum-puddingers till nearly eleven o'clock, I went up stairs to go to bed, feeling quite sure by this time Queequeg must certainly have brought his Ramadan to a termination.

Chapter 54 > Paragraph 6 > Sentence 2:

Now, gentlemen, in square-sail brigs and three-masted ships, well nigh as large and stout as any that ever sailed out of your old Callao to far Manilla; this Lakeman, in the land-locked heart of our America, had yet been nurtured by all those agrarian freebooting impressions popularly connected with the open ocean.

Chapter 64 > Paragraph 21 > Sentence 8:

I know some o' you has berry brig mout, brigger dan oders; but then de brig mouts sometimes has de small bellies; so dat de brigness of de mout is not to swaller wid, but to bit off de blubber for de small fry ob sharks, dat can't get into de scrouge to help demselves."

Chapter 96 > Paragraph 7 > Sentence 5:

So the pitch and sulphur-freighted brigs of the bold Hydriote, Canaris, issuing from their midnight harbors, with broad sheets of flame for sails, bore down upon the Turkish frigates, and folded them in conflagrations.

Concordance for the word brig from Moby-Dick.

Herman Melville
Moby-Dick Navigation
Search Moby-Dick