Pequod

Moby-Dick: Interlude

Interlude

  1. a short dramatic piece, esp. of a light or farcical character, formerly introduced between the parts or acts of miracle and morality plays or given as part of other entertainments

The word interlude appears in the following sentences from Moby-Dick:

Chapter 1 > Paragraph 11 > Sentence 7:

It came in as a sort of brief interlude and solo between more extensive performances.

Chapter 71 > Paragraph 17 > Sentence 1:

When this interlude was over, Captain Mayhew began a dark story concerning Moby Dick; not, however, without frequent interruptions from Gabriel, whenever his name was mentioned, and the crazy sea that seemed leagued with him.

Chapter 71 > Paragraph 30 > Sentence 1:

As, after this interlude, the seamen resumed their work upon the jacket of the whale, many strange things were hinted in reference to this wild affair.

Chapter 114 > Paragraph 1 > Sentence 2:

Often, in mild, pleasant weather, for twelve, fifteen, eighteen, and twenty hours on the stretch, they were engaged in the boats, steadily pulling, or sailing, or paddling after the whales, or for an interlude of sixty or seventy minutes calmly awaiting their uprising; though with but small success for their pains.

Concordance for the word interlude from Moby-Dick.

Herman Melville
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