Pequod

Moby-Dick: Reveries

Reveries

  1. absentminded dreaming while awake
  2. daydreams

The word reveries appears in the following sentences from Moby-Dick:

Chapter 1 > Paragraph 3 > Sentence 3:

What do you see?—Posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries.

Chapter 1 > Paragraph 5 > Sentence 5:

Let the most absent-minded of men be plunged in his deepest reveries—stand that man on his legs, set his feet a-going, and he will infallibly lead you to water, if water there be in all that region.

Chapter 44 > Paragraph 10 > Sentence 4:

And have I not tallied the whale, Ahab would mutter to himself, as after poring over his charts till long after midnight he would throw himself back in reveries—tallied him, and shall he escape?

Chapter 111 > Paragraph 2 > Sentence 2:

And meet it is, that over these sea-pastures, wide-rolling watery prairies and Potters' Fields of all four continents, the waves should rise and fall, and ebb and flow unceasingly; for here, millions of mixed shades and shadows, drowned dreams, somnambulisms, reveries; all that we call lives and souls, lie dreaming, dreaming, still; tossing like slumberers in their beds; the ever-rolling waves but made so by their restlessness.

Chapter 118 > Paragraph 2 > Sentence 8:

Then falling into a moment's revery, he again looked up towards the sun and murmured to himself: "Thou sea-mark! thou high and mighty Pilot! thou tellest me truly where I AM--but canst thou cast the least hint where I SHALL be?

Chapter 124 > Paragraph 14 > Sentence 1:

For a space the old man walked the deck in rolling reveries.

Chapter 126 > Paragraph 2 > Sentence 1:

At last, when the ship drew near to the outskirts, as it were, of the Equatorial fishing-ground, and in the deep darkness that goes before the dawn, was sailing by a cluster of rocky islets; the watch—then headed by Flask—was startled by a cry so plaintively wild and unearthly—like half-articulated wailings of the ghosts of all Herod's murdered Innocents—that one and all, they started from their reveries, and for the space of some moments stood, or sat, or leaned all transfixed by listening, like the carved Roman slave, while that wild cry remained within hearing.

Concordance for the word reveries from Moby-Dick.

Herman Melville
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