Pequod

Moby-Dick: Spar

Spar

  1. any round piece of timber used as a mast, yard, boom, or gaff
  2. Defintion 2

The word spar appears in the following sentences from Moby-Dick:

Chapter 1 > Paragraph 8 > Sentence 2:

True, they rather order me about some, and make me jump from spar to spar, like a grasshopper in a May meadow.

Chapter 13 > Paragraph 13 > Sentence 6:

In the midst of this consternation, Queequeg dropped deftly to his knees, and crawling under the path of the boom, whipped hold of a rope, secured one end to the bulwarks, and then flinging the other like a lasso, caught it round the boom as it swept over his head, and at the next jerk, the spar was that way trapped, and all was safe.

Chapter 108 > Paragraph 27 > Sentence 2:

Yes, I have heard something curious on that score; how that a dismasted man never entirely loses the feeling of his old spar, but it will be still pricking him at times.

Chapter 119 > Paragraph 31 > Sentence 1:

At the base of the main-mast, full beneath the doubloon and the flame, the Parsee was kneeling in Ahab's front, but with his head bowed away from him; while near by, from the arched and overhanging rigging, where they had just been engaged securing a spar, a number of the seamen, arrested by the glare, now cohered together, and hung pendulous, like a knot of numbed wasps from a drooping, orchard twig.

Chapter 134 > Paragraph 12 > Sentence 3:

Clinging to a spar with one hand, some reached forth the other with impatient wavings; others, shading their eyes from the vivid sunlight, sat far out on the rocking yards; all the spars in full bearing of mortals, ready and ripe for their fate.

Chapter 135 > Paragraph 1 > Sentence 1:

The morning of the third day dawned fair and fresh, and once more the solitary night-man at the fore-mast-head was relieved by crowds of the daylight look-outs, who dotted every mast and almost every spar.

Chapter 135 > Paragraph 70 > Sentence 1:

But as the last whelmings intermixingly poured themselves over the sunken head of the Indian at the mainmast, leaving a few inches of the erect spar yet visible, together with long streaming yards of the flag, which calmly undulated, with ironical coincidings, over the destroying billows they almost touched;—at that instant, a red arm and a hammer hovered backwardly uplifted in the open air, in the act of nailing the flag faster and yet faster to the subsiding spar.

Concordance for the word spar from Moby-Dick.

Herman Melville
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